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Sunday, 27 November 2016

Bake Perfect Boerewors Roll Buns

In the previous blog I shared some ideas for preparing a whole meal on your kettle braai (barbecue). Among the dishes I'd prepared for the braai were some mouthwatering delicious buns for making boerewors rolls. I have developed this recipe specifically to enhance the flavours of the traditional boerewors and everyone who has ever tasted it is in agreement that this makes the good old boerewors roll something noteworthy. Want in on the secret? I share my recipe for these flavourful buns with you in today's blog.


When baking bread on the fire, I always start by mixing my bread dough first, before starting the fire. This gives the dough time to rise. In a large mixing bowl, measure 2 cups (500 ml) white bread flour, 2 cups (500 ml) cake flour, 1 tablespoon (12,5 ml) sugar and 2 teaspoons (10 ml) salt.
Option 1: If you are in a hurry, you can add a packet of Instant Dry Yeast to the dry ingredients. This will speed up the time it takes the dough to rise.


Most of us enjoy a boerewors roll with a tomato and onion relish. That is why the traditional Italian herbs go so well with the boerewors roll. Add 1 teaspoon (5 ml) dried parsley, 1 teaspoon (5 ml) sweet basil and 1/2 teaspoon (2,5 ml) oregano.


Mix the dry ingredients well.


Now add 1 cup (250 ml) lukewarm water, 1 cup (250 ml) sourdough starter, 1 egg, 50 ml cooking oil and 1 teaspoon (5 ml) crushed garlic to the dry ingredients.
Option 2: If using Active Dry Yeast, add a packet to the water and sugar and allow 10 minutes for it to froth up.


Bring the dough together.


Knead for about 10 minutes.


Flatten the dough with your fingers and shape it into a rough rectangle.


Roll the dough out to about 1 cm thick.


Divide into three.


Then divide into 4 to give you 12 dough squares.


Roll the squares up. Brush the ends with egg to keep it from unrolling.


Space the dough rolls out on a baking tray prepared with non-stick spray and lightly floured.


Cover with plastic and allow to rise in a warm dry place.


I absolutely prefer a wood fire. Wood will give a distinctive smoked flavour to the bread that can not be copied by charcoal.


Once the dough is risen, brush the rolls with egg to give it a crisp shiny finish when baked. The egg also adds a little more flavour.


The barbecue is ready when the thermometer shows that the temperature inside the braai is roughly 200-240 °C. Place an empty oven dish on the grill. Line it up with the front leg of the braai.


Place the baking tray with the rolls on the oven dish, in line with the front leg. Lining things up in the kettle braai, results in a more even heat distribution. Putting the oven dish between the fire and the rolls, creates a barrier, preventing the bottoms from burning.


Close the lid and bake for roughly 10-15 minutes. The exact time will vary depending on the exact temperature of your braai. Do not check the braai before 10 minutes have passed.


Remove from the heat when the rolls turn a golden colour.


You should hear a hollow sound when you knock on the bottom of the rolls. This indicates the rolls are ready. If not, simply pop them back in the braai and continue baking. They should be baked well enough not to collapse, at this stage.


Allow to cool on a wire rack.


Enjoy with boerewors hot off the grill and a lovely tomato and onion relish. That distinctive smoked taste, combined with the Italian herbs and the hint of garlic, can not be surpassed by shop-bought rolls! Try it and find discover this for yourself! Your friends and family will love you for this.


Marietjie Uys (Miekie) is a published author. You can buy the books here:
You can purchase Designs By Miekie 1 here.
Jy kan Kom Ons Teken en Verf Tuinstories hier koop.
Jy kan Kom Ons Kleur Tuinstories In hier koop.
Jy kan Tuinstories hier koop.
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